Springwise
Your daily fix of new business ideas Springwise and its network of 17,000 spotters scan the globe for smart new business ideas, delivering instant inspiration to entrepreneurial minds. More at www.springwise.com
logo
Your daily fix of new business ideas Springwise and its network of 17,000 spotters scan the globe for smart new business ideas, delivering instant inspiration to entrepreneurial minds. More at www.springwise.com
Google Glass-style helmet combines protection and data for industrial workers
While wearable technology has so far been marketed at the consumer, there are many business cases for products that make data more readily available to workers in the field. We’ve previously written about the Golden-i Wireless Headset, which provides firefighters with maps and information about oxygen levels in dangerous environments. Now the DAQRI Smart Helmet is providing industrial workers with hardhat protection while also using an augmented reality to help them navigate sites. READ MORE…
On-demand butler taps multiple services to take care of every household chore
In sci-fi tropes, robots of the future are created largely to act as bionic servants that carry out the tasks humans don’t want to do. While that vision is quite a way off, we have seen other uses of technology to help busy (or lazy) homeowners to get jobs done. While apps such as STANDWITH have helped the infirm to leverage their friends and neighbors to take care of their daily chores, Alfred is a service that crowdsources local helpers to act as a butler service for laundry, shopping and cleaning tasks. READ MORE…
This ring lets blind people read non-Braille books
One of the problems with Braille is that it’s typically printed in specialist books aside from the copies created for sighted people, meaning that those with sight difficulties can’t borrow their friends’ books and need to seek out the bookstores and libraries that cater for them. In the past, we’ve seen projects such as Thailand’sMr. Light and Mr. Dark — which uses special typography to enable the blind and non-blind to read the same book. Now the FingerReader initiative from MIT provides visually impaired readers with a wearable ring that can scan written text and read it out loud. READ MORE…
iOS app turns smartphones into an automated teleprompter
Those who regularly speak at conferences will know how much of a help a teleprompter can be in making sure they keep on track and don’t fumble their words. However, it’s not a luxury that every speaking occasion affords. PromptSmart  is an iOS app that mimics the standard autocue, using voice recognition to track users’ place in the text. READ MORE…
Waterproof smart band lets lifeguards know your emergency information
Lifeguards will be well aware that in the case of an emergency on the beach or by the pool, time is of the essence. Lives could be saved more frequently if responders had access to the right information to allow them to act more quickly. With this in mind, Safe Mate is a wristband for swimmers and surfers that stores medical and emergency data in case they need assistance. READ MORE…
Offline device stores user passwords and deletes them if it’s tampered with
The information we place online is highly private — ranging from credit card details to personal photos — and yet the average consumer continues to use a single password for their multiple accounts. In order to encourage web users to diversify their security measures, Gilmo is a device that allows them to quickly pull up the password for any account without storing the details online. READ MORE…
Hotel restaurant’s pop-up store lets diners wear what they eat
The hospitality industry is a hotbed of resource waste and unsustainable practices. Bedsheets need washing every night, lights are left on 24/7 for guests coming and going, and leftover food can’t be reused and has to be thrown away. In the past, hotel chains such as UK Marriott have aimed to recycle resources by turning its used bedsheets into the Bed Linen Tote as a memento for customers. Now Marlow Goods has launched a pop-up store at the Wythe Hotel in Brooklyn, which turns meat byproducts from the venue’s restaurant into leather clothes and bags for guests. READ MORE…
Portable, wireless cash register is designed for informal economies
Running a business in environments such as Africa is a completely different challenge than in the Western world thanks to lack of access to electricity and unreliable internet infrastructure. In the past we’ve seen portable devices such as the eChaja enable anyone to sell phone charging facilities wherever they are. Now Nomanini has created a rugged point-of-sale register that can facilitate cash payments for airtime, electricity and insurance. READ MORE…
Add-on turns bike helmets into a lock
Sometimes bike riders just need to drop into a store or café to quickly pick up a coffee or something on their shopping list. Since most stores don’t like riders carry their bikes inside, they either have to risk propping them up with no security or go through the whole process of locking up. Now Belgium-based sportswear company Lazer has developed the Cappuccino Lock, a helmet strap add-on that enables bike owners to use their helmet to quickly lock both. READ MORE…
In France, supermarket turns ugly fruit and veg into own-brand soups and juices

The amount of perfectly edible food that gets thrown away is now well documented, and yet there still aren’t too many options for retailers to ensure they avoid contributing to the problem. We recently wrote about the UK’s Sainsbury’s chain, which is powering one of its outlets entirely from the food waste it produces. Now Intermarché is now turning fruit and veg that’s too ugly to sell into a range of new products. READ MORE…
Smart power adaptors track seniors’ daily routines to make sure they’re ok
The population of the elderly is growing, and along with it the strain on nursing homes. Even if some seniors value the independence of living in their own home, they can still worry about the lack of help if an accident happens. We’ve previously written about Amulyte, a wearable emergency assistance button that helps seniors let family and caregivers know if they’re in trouble, wherever they are. While this could help the elderly lead more active lives, it comes with the price of having to wear it constantly. Evermind is a new system which tracks the seniors’ use of home devices so that relatives can be alerted to breaks in routine. READ MORE…
For premature babies, haptic mattress helps them feel their mother’s heartbeat
Around 15 million premature babies are born every year, and many of those need to spend at least the first weeks of their lives in isolation before they can go home with their parents. However, during this time they lose the vital physical and emotional connection with their mother, who is often limited to one hour of holding time a day. Platforms such as BabyTime, which uses Apple’s FaceTime system to visually connect mothers with their newborns, have previously tried to tackle this disconnection. Now, Babybe is a system that translates mothers’ heartbeats into haptic feedback for the baby inside the ICU. READ MORE…
Sandals for kids grow as they do
Any parent will tell you that kids grow at an alarming rate, meaning that clothes and other products have a ridiculously short lifespan as their bodies and personalities change. Some product developers have attempted to tackle this — takeThe Froc chair or Orbea bike for example. Now a UK design student has created Grow, a pair of sandals that can be adjusted to cater for bigger feet as children get older. READ MORE…
Service taps communities’ unused storage space
In financially unstable times, more people are looking to take advantage of the sharing economy to save money on goods and services they only use occasionally. We recently wrote about Canada’s Kitchen Library, which gives consumers low-cost access to otherwise expensive cooking equipment. For homeowners who can’t afford to use self storage services, there’s now Roost, a peer-to-peer platform that lets them find and rent storage space from others in their neighborhood. READ MORE…
At hotel for cyclists, guests can ride right up to reception
For those who want to see the world by bike, there aren’t actually that many options when they travel — most hotels don’t provide secure facilities for locking them away, and airlines often charge extra for taking them on board. In Japan, Hotel Cycle is hoping to make cyclists feel more welcome, with accommodation designed especially for bike-riding tourists. READ MORE…