Springwise
Your daily fix of new business ideas Springwise and its network of 17,000 spotters scan the globe for smart new business ideas, delivering instant inspiration to entrepreneurial minds. More at www.springwise.com
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Your daily fix of new business ideas Springwise and its network of 17,000 spotters scan the globe for smart new business ideas, delivering instant inspiration to entrepreneurial minds. More at www.springwise.com
3D printed reproductions enable gallery visitors to touch and feel precious historical objects
A parent’s worst nightmare during a museum visit can be when kids try to grab the artefacts on display, but ‘no touching’ rules do present a barrier to interaction, making exhibitions less engaging. Dutch designer and art historian Maaike Roozenburg now hopes to change this with her Smart Replicas project, which uses augmented reality and 3D printed reproductions of priceless museum objects to make visits more hands-on. READ MORE…
3D printed kids’ books enable blind readers to visualize the story
We’ve already seen how on-demand 3D printing can turn simple web searches into a tactile experience for the visually impaired through Yahoo! Japan’s Hands On Search. Now the Tactile Picture Books Project is using the technology to help blind readers use their hands to get more from illustrated narratives. READ MORE…
Wireless earbuds are custom 3D printed so they won’t fall out
Earbud headphones come as standard with most smartphones, but they’re typically prone to breaking, and their one-size-fits-all design means that they can be uncomfortable and fall out when exercising. In the past, we’ve seen HeadFoams make the devices more durable, especially for young users. Now OwnPhones is enabling consumers to customize their earbuds to their own unique style and ear shape through 3D printing. READ MORE…
OwnFone launches world’s first 3D printed Braille phone
While smartphones can do incredible things these days, they’re still too expensive or complicated for some consumers, such as the elderly, disabled or technophobic. We wrote about OwnFone back in 2012 when it began offering cheap and small customizable phones that only receive and make calls to pre-selected numbers. Now the company is back with the Braille Phone, a credit-card sized device that can be easily used by those without full vision. READ MORE…
App uses video of customers’ feet to 3D print the perfect shoe for them
The mass-manufactured shoes we typically wear are designed to fit the average foot, which means they don’t provide the unique support requirements of individuals’ feet. While new technologies such as Germany’s OpenGo science have provided the tools for doctors and sports scientists to analyze foot problems, 3D printed insole maker SOLS has now developed an app that lets consumers simply shoot video of their foot to help them create an orthotic insole tailored to them. READ MORE…
3D-printed makeup is created from color hex codes
We’ve already seen 3D printing enable consumers to create their own jewelry courtesy of startups such as Zazzy in the Netherlands. But what about cosmetics? Mink is a 3D printer that lets anyone print their own makeup by choosing a color from their computer. READ MORE…
MakerBot’s kids’ book teaches them about 3D printing
We featured Brooklyn-based MakerBot on these pages back in 2010 thanks to its efforts to bring 3D printing to the masses with its initial range of build-your-own desktop machines. Now the project has created LEO the Maker Prince, a children’s storybook that helps them learn about 3D printing and then download files to bring the characters to life. READ MORE…
In Peru, beach cleanup scheme helps disadvantaged people become entrepreneurs
The ocean is full of waste produced by humans, and beaches often end up collecting the debris that washes ashore, which is unsightly and potentially deadly to marine animals. While cleanup initiatives have the obvious benefit of ridding trash from coastlines, the recyclable waste can also be used for creating products and opportunities. In the past we’ve seen schemes in the UK develop the Sea Chair — a stool made entirely of trash trawled from the ocean — and now Plastic Bank is enabling those participating in beach cleanups in Peru to exchange their help for training, micro-loans and access to 3D printing facilities. READ MORE…
Marketplace’s mass produced, 3D-printed products are never exactly the same
3D printing has for a while been touted as a game changer in mass production, and we have already seen how the technology can be applied to consumer-facing business — for example, the Netherlands’ Zazzy platform, which lets customers design their own jewelry. Now a new marketplace called Dyo offers ‘artisanal’ mass-produced items that each feature individual design quirks and can be customized by the consumer. READ MORE…
3D printer lets users fax physical objects
3D printing is a great innovation in its own right, but perhaps more interesting is the consumer uses that are now being developed around it. Yahoo! Japan has already created a 3D-printing search engine for blind kids, and now AIO Robotics’ ZEUS enables users to print, scan, copy and even fax 3D objects. READ MORE…
3D-printing medical supplies on-demand in Haiti
Natural disasters can hit countries hard, and Haiti — which experienced a massive earthquake three years ago — is no exception, and that’s to say nothing of the poverty that pervades the country’s society. Vital community resources are often low, or missing altogether, especially when it comes to healthcare. Now a new project called iLab Haiti is hoping to use 3D printing to solve some of the country’s immediate needs. READ MORE…
Fast food for the digital age: Meals are 3D-printed
The 20th century ushered in the age of mass produced food, which — for better or worse — has fed the population with an endless array of new dishes and delicacies. The 21st century food industry may come to be about the individual customization with 3D printed food, however, if two new startups get their way. READ MORE…
Desktop 3D printer uses molten metal
3D printing has so far been limited to plastics, but regular visitors to Springwise will have recently read about the DIWire, a machine that bends metal wire according to digital designs. Now aiming to make desktop 3D metal printing a reality, Vader Systems is developing a device which uses molten aluminum in place of plastic. READ MORE…
Machine bends wire into anything
The 3D printing revolution is in full swing and is providing inspiration for a number of similar ways of creating new objects. We’ve already seen how successful the 3Doodler pen — which enables users to draw physical pieces into existence — has been, and now the DIWire hopes to follow suit by bringing wirebending capabilities to designers’ desktops for easy wireframe prototyping. READ MORE…
On platform, businesses bid to 3D print consumer designs
The 3D printing revolution is set to open up a new generation of consumer-creators, but only if the average consumer can get access to the technology. In the past we’ve seen makexyz offer a platform for anyone to connect with local printers, but a new site called CowFab is seeing 3D printing facilities competing to work on designers’ projects by offering them the best deal. READ MORE…